EACA http://eaca.eu European Association of Communications Agencies Tue, 21 Feb 2017 09:48:12 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.7.2 http://eaca.eu/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/logo-150x100.png EACA http://eaca.eu 32 32 A Day in the Life of a Strategy Director http://eaca.eu/day-life-strategy-director/ http://eaca.eu/day-life-strategy-director/#respond Mon, 06 Feb 2017 09:25:20 +0000 http://eaca.eu/?p=2523 When I was 14 years old, my older sister gave me a book “Ogilvy on advertising”. She told me that I might be interested in it. As usual, she was right. This year I will be 30 and I am still interested in it. Here’s a typical day of my life as a Strategy Director at Zaraguza. 5:50 am: Shh.. […]

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When I was 14 years old, my older sister gave me a book “Ogilvy on advertising”. She told me that I might be interested in it. As usual, she was right. This year I will be 30 and I am still interested in it.

Here’s a typical day of my life as a Strategy Director at Zaraguza.

5:50 am: Shh..

6:00 am: Oh, come on.

6:10 am: Ok mate, wake up. Pretty though season is coming up, you have to be in shape and ready.

7:50 am: Morning run is done. Quick 11 kilometer run in – 4 degrees, a lovely way to kick your brain into a busy day. Now endorphins, please, do your job.

9:00 am: Arriving at work. We are having quick status meeting about the on-going projects with our team. It seems that there is a lot of cool stuff to do.

10:00 am: Meeting with the client. We are discussing activity plan for the next year. So many things to do, but we got a very limited budget. We are identifying priorities, top needs and their potential for social media. I hope we got them and everything is much clearer now.

12:00 am: Lunch before client presentation. It is a very important tender and this is our final pitch. We are a little bit nervous, but we know that we have done our best. Communication concepts are based on a solid data and consumer insights, the ideas are clear and creative executions look awesome, so let’s go.

1:30 pm: We are after the presentation. Our first feelings are great, so let’s get our fingers crossed. Can’t wait for the feedback, we really want to win this account.

2:00 pm: Time for a table football with colleagues. It is the best way to give your brain a short break and try to kick some asses.

3:00 pm: Review with the creative team. They have done a good job, we are still looking for the new prospective on how to look at the product proposition. I have been in this business for more than 6 years and I am still wondering how fragile every single idea can be.

5:00 pm: Time to finish the presentation for the next day. Our potential client is local based company, which is operating on 8 European markets in fashion industry. What a great challenge and opportunity at the same time.

8:30 pm: I’m done. Meeting my girlfriend for dinner and beer. Cheers.

 

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A day in the life of a Planner http://eaca.eu/day-in-the-life-planner/ http://eaca.eu/day-in-the-life-planner/#respond Mon, 09 Jan 2017 10:56:11 +0000 http://eaca.eu/?p=2405 After having worked as a planner in Belgium for about three years and London for about 4 years, I moved to Tokyo to join Wieden+Kennedy last summer. It meant learning everything fresh. How to think, how to talk, how to do research, how to write creative briefs, … To be a planner in an entirely […]

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After having worked as a planner in Belgium for about three years and London for about 4 years, I moved to Tokyo to join Wieden+Kennedy last summer. It meant learning everything fresh. How to think, how to talk, how to do research, how to write creative briefs, … To be a planner in an entirely alien culture can be daunting, but it’s the kind of thing a curious mind thrives on.

For this day in the life, I chose to describe one of my early days in Tokyo, because it reflects the sense of newness that is so unique to first moving here.

7am: I wake up, nice and diligently (I think this happened. Once. Surely on this day.), because it’s a Monday, and that means I’ve got my Japanese class at noon. It also means that I’ve got homework to finish. I finish my homework at a coffee place nearby where I live.

9.30am: Arriving at work and proud to now master the phrase ‘ga suki desu’ (‘I like’). I feel like this phrase will be a useful conversation maker. Mondays start with status meetings. The Nike team (we’re about 6 people) gets together to chat about the workload for the week. It’s an interesting week because we’ve got a few creative projects going on, as well as consumer research.

10.30am: We gather in the studio area for a creative check-in. This is the first time I’m seeing the ideas that the creative team came up with based on my brief. All ideas have been stuck up on a wall and we go through the five different directions one by one. There’s a whole lot of great stuff there but I specifically love one of the directions because it takes a very traditional Japanese concept and turns it completely on its head. We discuss the different ideas and decide on two directions to focus on and develop further, in preparation of a client presentation the week after.

12.30am: Time for Japanese class, followed by lunch.

3.30pm: We leave for consumer research. It’s actually taking place at a karaoke parlour, because it’s a nice and convenient public place to gather a group of people in the middle of the day. We’re chatting with two young Japanese guys about their life, their ambitions, their hopes and their worries. And about sport, of course. They used to play baseball but quit that and started their own cycling team when they went into university. They say it’s a nicer way to stay active, without having to be competitive. They are both excited and content at the same time, and seem to have thought their decision through very carefully. I feel very fortunate to be able to do this research so early on after arriving in Japan because it’s the best possible introduction to this new culture and its youth. Even more, their experience of sport seems to offer a great perspective on what it’s like to be young in Japan.

The group that is conducting this research is quite small: a moderator, a translator, two other planners and me. After the research, we go for a dinner together in an izakaya nearby and discuss what we have just learned, over chicken skewers, fresh sashimi and a few high ball’s. We also put together a couple of questions and hypotheses that we want to explore further in the other interviews later that week.

9pm: I arrive home after a long, but interesting day, energized by the fact that I got a little bit closer to understanding this fascinating culture.

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Legal challenges for advertising in 2017: what’s in store for agencies? http://eaca.eu/legal-challenges-advertising-2017-whats-store-agencies/ http://eaca.eu/legal-challenges-advertising-2017-whats-store-agencies/#comments Mon, 09 Jan 2017 10:54:24 +0000 http://eaca.eu/?p=2409 2017 is not even in full swing yet, but we can already expect big advocacy battles in Brussels on a couple of crucial files which will determine advertising in Europe for the following decade or so. The regulatory pressure has never been higher and advertising is up for many game-changers. Let’s see which issues are […]

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2017 is not even in full swing yet, but we can already expect big advocacy battles in Brussels on a couple of crucial files which will determine advertising in Europe for the following decade or so. The regulatory pressure has never been higher and advertising is up for many game-changers.

Let’s see which issues are on the table:

  1. Privacy and more privacy

The European Commission is about to propose a piece of legislation, replacing the ePrivacy Directive, which currently regulates how and when an entity accesses or stores information (such as cookies and other online identifiers) on one’s terminal equipment (mobile phones, laptops, tablets etc.) Why does it matter for the ad industry?

It is very likely that the Commission will propose very onerous rules giving consumers more control, but at the same time distorting 3rd party data processing. This would effectively mean that agencies and other 3rd parties relying on advertising service providers might be left out in the cold.

  1. Tick-tock, tick-tock… Time for GDPR!

2017 will be a year when agencies will have to undertake considerable effort in order to comply with the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). All businesses will have to fully comply with GDPR as of May 2018. As our friends from the World Federation of Advertisers already noted, the advertising industry will need to be more agile about all GDPR implications and to speed up their preparations (Brexit or no Brexit).

  1. Advertising of alcohol and foods high in sugar and salt

The discussions about the Audiovisual Media Services Directive (regulating broadcasting TV and some on-demand services) and how to regulate advertising of alcohol and foods are heating up! To cut the story short: there is increasing pressure from consumer groups and NGOs to significantly reduce/limit/stop (you name it!) children’s exposure to food advertising. Watch this space for more info, as the discussions unravel.

  1. Consumer protection is an all-encompassing issue

The Commission will carry on the assessment of consumer protection regulatory framework. This exercise is highly important because it will determine if and how notions of vulnerable consumers (i.e. children), misleading advertising, eco-claims etc. will change. When you can say in an advert that something is eco-friendly, and how to protect children from harmful content are only some of the issues to be resolved.

  1. Can we compete now?

The underlying common theme of all of the afore-mentioned challenges is how to get the regulation right so that it allows agencies to compete with other service providers of the advertising industry. In short, this means that we advocate for regulation which will not inadvertently favour some companies at the expense of others.

For more information on all of the above, you can contact me directly at: stevan.randjelovic@eaca.eu.

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Agencies: Thought Leaders of the Ad Industry http://eaca.eu/agencies-thought-leaders-ad-industry/ http://eaca.eu/agencies-thought-leaders-ad-industry/#respond Wed, 30 Nov 2016 15:30:01 +0000 http://eaca.eu/?p=2251 Remember that airline ad making you miss your mum instantly, or that beverage commercial giving you chills? Neither do I. But I am positive that you have a favourite funny creative piece or a strategically placed ad, both of which passed through the hands of an agency, in one way or another. Agencies have always been at the heart of the greatest and most memorable campaigns the world has ever seen.

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Remember that airline ad that made you miss your mum instantly, or that beverage commercial that gave you chills? Neither do I. But I am positive that you have a favourite funny creative piece or a strategically placed ad, both of which passed through the hands of an agency, in one way or another. Agencies have always been at the heart of the greatest and most memorable campaigns the world has ever seen.

But it used to be easier to be an agency, right? Create an ad and connect traditional advertisers with traditional media. That was it. Nowadays agencies are expected to produce top notch creative material, lure consumers through the entire brand funnel, have the hottest digital influencers on speed dial, navigate hundreds (if not thousands) of different digital media providers, secure viewability, ensure brand safety, negotiate the best media deals, find a unicorn… It’s a never-ending list of what is required from agencies today. And all of that for increasingly eroding fees.

Now, let’s try and put this into perspective: agencies can choose to try and be all things to all men or to enable different players by providing them with what agencies do best: strategy and planning.

Creative and media strategizing is the agencies’ unique selling point. It is an axis of the ad industry as well. Campaigns need to be built on a consumer insight, an emotional touch and the right data sets if they are to sell. Only agencies have the necessary experience, accumulated over years, to make you cry while watching a Christmas commercial for your nearby airport. And no, algorithms and machines cannot do it all. It takes a human touch; an agency touch to make a campaign peak.

Agencies should be the leaders of the ad chain, connecting industry players and enabling successful campaigns. I know you’re thinking agencies should already been doing this, that it’s their role. And you’re right. It is their role. But they need to get better at it. Better yet, they need to be more confident and disruptive in their role. Omnicom had the right idea when they created a McDonald’s dedicated unit by providing an agency impetus to a much larger team consisting of Google and Facebook techies, New York Times content writers and others. We are yet to see how this co-operation will function, but it’s an admirable try.

Agencies need to embrace the fact that they hold very profound knowledge and diverse skills and should free themselves from the currency of fear by acting confidently on it. You know how they say you are appreciated by others, only to the extent that you appreciate yourself? Clients hold the wallet, but it’s about time for agencies to realise that they hold the knowledge.

Obviously, it’s not easy. Agencies need to disrupt, or be disrupted. (I know…you hear this cliché all the time. But it’s true!). If they continue being enablers of the wider industry, they need to be at the wellhead of innovations and spot them early on.

With confidence and more forward thinking, agencies can become what they are supposed to be: thought leaders of the ad industry.

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